Micro Geek Moscow
I … conclude that the city’s highest officials have turned a blind eye to the evidence that officers are conducting stops in a racially discriminatory manner.

A judge has ruled that the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practice violates Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure, as well as the equal-protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

[h/t nytimes]

(via cheatsheet)

(via newsweek)

charlietodd:

For the latest Improv Everywhere project, we converted a New York City subway car into a late night talk show set. Host Pat Cassels (CollegeHumor) interviewed random commuters from his desk as bandleader Evan Gregory (The Gregory Brothers) kept the car rocking.

Full story with photos: Talk Show Subway Car | Improv Everywhere

oxfamgb:

If you’re planning on coming to the #LondonMela tomorrow, be sure to stop by and check out the Oxfam tent! There will be professional makeovers, prizes, celebrity signings, stilt walkers, face-painting, henna tattoos and lots more activities for all the family. Plus you can find out about our life-changing work in South Asia. http://bit.ly/154swqd

oxfamgb:

If you’re planning on coming to the #LondonMela tomorrow, be sure to stop by and check out the Oxfam tent! There will be professional makeovers, prizes, celebrity signings, stilt walkers, face-painting, henna tattoos and lots more activities for all the family. Plus you can find out about our life-changing work in South Asia. http://bit.ly/154swqd

centuriespast:

Aphrodite-Isis
Egypto-Roman
Date: 1st-2nd Century
North Carolina Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Aphrodite-Isis

Egypto-Roman

Date: 1st-2nd Century

North Carolina Museum of Art

eyeonspringfield:

"When I was a kid this used to be a pet store…"

eyeonspringfield:

"When I was a kid this used to be a pet store…"

// Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre: NGV, Melbourne, Australia//

ceramicsnow:

Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

Containment: 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award / The Ian Potter Centre, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
November 23, 2012 - July 21, 2013

The theme of ‘containment’ will be explored by fourteen Victorian artists for the 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award.

The Award focuses on contemporary design practice in Victoria and is arguably the most prestigious offered to a contemporary practitioner in Australia with a prize of $30,000 provided through the Cicely & Colin Rigg Bequest, managed by ANZ Trustees.

Tony Ellwood, NGV Director, said, “This year’s Award presents an exciting mix of Victorian artists and reflects the NGV’s ongoing commitment to contemporary design. The NGV is only able to stage this important event thanks to the vision of the Trustees of the Rigg Bequest and the foresight of the generous benefactors, Cicely and Colin Rigg.”

Teresa Zolnierkiewicz, Head of Philanthropy, ANZ Trustees, said, “The Rigg Bequest is a generous legacy of the late Colin Rigg (1895-1982). He was inspired by the Felton Bequest to create something in his own will that developed the arts in Victoria. This award, designed by the Trustees in partnership with the NGV, serves as a demonstration of the power of philanthropy to nurture and support artists and designers, vital to a thriving society.”

The participating artists in 2012 are: Garry Bish, Robin Bold, Emma Davies, Mark Edgoose, Neville French, Titania Henderson, Marian Hosking, Richard Morrell, Ian Mowbray, David Pottinger, David Ray, Owen Rye, Yhonnie Scarce and Katherine Wheeler.

Amanda Dunsmore, Curator, International Decorative Arts & Antiquities, NGV, said, “The choice of a theme for this year’s Award, rather than a specific area of practice, allows great scope for interpretation. Many of the works employ a sculptural aesthetic while remaining inherently functional, yet they play with the possibilities of what might be, beyond their practical value. Other works are presented in the context of a traditional concept.”

Previous recipients of the Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award are Neville Assad-Sadha (1994) for ceramics, Robert Baines (1997) for metalwork, Louise Weaver (2003) for textiles, Sally Marsland (2006) for jewellery and Simone LeAmon (2009) for seated furniture.

Emma Mayall, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, said, “This year’s group of artists represents a diverse mix of emerging and established practitioners. The vibrancy of Victorian design is highlighted through the wide range of practice and media represented, including ceramics, glass, metalwork, plastics and natural materials.”

The recipient of the 2012 Cicely & Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award is Marian Hosking. The prize of $30,000 was awarded to Ms Hosking for her work Clearing. Ms Hosking said, “It’s an honour to be chosen for an award that celebrates the diversity and vibrancy of contemporary Victorian craft and design. I’m overwhelmed to be selected from such a stellar group and appreciate that craft is visible within the National Gallery of Victoria.”

Read More

thedailybadass:

Not to be outdone by Chance and Hattie, Badass alum Daisy and her brother Beau have submitted their own “Make Yourself Comfortable” photos. Mom and Daisy were cuddling on the couch when Beau decided he wanted in on the action.

"Guys, you weren’t cuddling without me, were you? Let me just get a little bit closer … closer … perfect. What are we talking about guys?"

Restaurant review: At Le Bilboquet, a glittering scene
Dallas on August 2013.


Updated: 07 August 2013 06:36 PM
Related

    Restaurant review: Pozo Mercado has a sunny disposition and a terrific selection of mescals (2 stars)

    Leslie Brenner’s Restaurant Week best bets

When Le Bilboquet, a 27-year-old French bistro on New York City’s Upper East Side, came to the end of its lease and closed its doors (with a plan to reopen later elsewhere in the city), one of its former managers, Stephane Courseau, had the idea of opening a Le Bilboquet in Dallas with the same menu and chef.

The idea was positively brilliant. Dallas has a serious paucity of French restaurants. The Knox-Henderson location Corseau and business partner Laurent Lesort managed to snag was the recently closed L’Ancestral, a sentimental favorite with the Park Cities crowd. The Upper East Side is the Manhattan equivalent of the Park Cities: old school, conservative, lots of money.

The restaurant should translate perfectly.

And it does.

It’s at once buzzy and intimate, very much a scene. Hard to imagine it was once L’Ancestral, so radically has the dining room changed. The transformation goes way beyond the decor — Lesort gutted the place, and what used to be small, dark, grandmotherly comforting, quiet and cozy is now open, airy, light and vibrant.

Just the place to dally with a prettily arranged Belgian endive-and-Roquefort salad. Dressed generously (or heavily, depending on your point of view) in a Dijon vinaigrette emulsified to creaminess, the colorful chop, perky with tomatoes, was accented nicely with toasted walnuts.

Or a towerlike assemblage of chunky avocado salad and mayonnaisey crab salad. Chef “Momo” Sow sets it on a small pool of tomato coulis, adding circles of basil-chive oil, presumably for color (it had little flavor), and a jaunty hat of fried won-ton skin strips for crunch. There’s nothing cutting-edge or original in these starters; they recall the stylish French food served in New York and Paris in the 1980s or early ’90s. Safe, familiar and often well-executed, at Le Bilboquet they seem captured in a time wrinkle.

You’d never have seen such a gigantic portion of tuna tartare for one person in Paris, though; Le Bilboquet’s would do nicely for a family of four. Sow dresses it prodigiously with sesame vinaigrette, sandwiches it between fried won-ton skins and decorates it with diced tomato and cucumber. The first few bites are pleasant, but there’s not enough going on in the dish to hold one’s interest. For $22, I’m looking for something with more panache; sesame seeds scattered on the plate don’t do the trick.

Restaurant review: At Le Bilboquet, a glittering scene Dallas on August 2013. Updated: 07 August 2013 06:36 PM Related Restaurant review: Pozo Mercado has a sunny disposition and a terrific selection of mescals (2 stars) Leslie Brenner’s Restaurant Week best bets When Le Bilboquet, a 27-year-old French bistro on New York City’s Upper East Side, came to the end of its lease and closed its doors (with a plan to reopen later elsewhere in the city), one of its former managers, Stephane Courseau, had the idea of opening a Le Bilboquet in Dallas with the same menu and chef. The idea was positively brilliant. Dallas has a serious paucity of French restaurants. The Knox-Henderson location Corseau and business partner Laurent Lesort managed to snag was the recently closed L’Ancestral, a sentimental favorite with the Park Cities crowd. The Upper East Side is the Manhattan equivalent of the Park Cities: old school, conservative, lots of money. The restaurant should translate perfectly. And it does. It’s at once buzzy and intimate, very much a scene. Hard to imagine it was once L’Ancestral, so radically has the dining room changed. The transformation goes way beyond the decor — Lesort gutted the place, and what used to be small, dark, grandmotherly comforting, quiet and cozy is now open, airy, light and vibrant. Just the place to dally with a prettily arranged Belgian endive-and-Roquefort salad. Dressed generously (or heavily, depending on your point of view) in a Dijon vinaigrette emulsified to creaminess, the colorful chop, perky with tomatoes, was accented nicely with toasted walnuts. Or a towerlike assemblage of chunky avocado salad and mayonnaisey crab salad. Chef “Momo” Sow sets it on a small pool of tomato coulis, adding circles of basil-chive oil, presumably for color (it had little flavor), and a jaunty hat of fried won-ton skin strips for crunch. There’s nothing cutting-edge or original in these starters; they recall the stylish French food served in New York and Paris in the 1980s or early ’90s. Safe, familiar and often well-executed, at Le Bilboquet they seem captured in a time wrinkle. You’d never have seen such a gigantic portion of tuna tartare for one person in Paris, though; Le Bilboquet’s would do nicely for a family of four. Sow dresses it prodigiously with sesame vinaigrette, sandwiches it between fried won-ton skins and decorates it with diced tomato and cucumber. The first few bites are pleasant, but there’s not enough going on in the dish to hold one’s interest. For $22, I’m looking for something with more panache; sesame seeds scattered on the plate don’t do the trick.

Cleansing the Body – How Juices Can Help These days, getting a juice cleanse would be beneficial for most people. This is because our diets usually consist of processed foods that contain non-organic ingredients and chemicals. In addition, we are constantly exposed to fumes, smoke, and VOCs in the air.   Of course, our bodies […]The post Cleansing the Body – How to Juice cleanse appeared first on Naked Juice Diet - Juicing & Fasting The RIGHT WAY.

Cleansing the Body – How Juices Can Help These days, getting a juice cleanse would be beneficial for most people. This is because our diets usually consist of processed foods that contain non-organic ingredients and chemicals. In addition, we are constantly exposed to fumes, smoke, and VOCs in the air.   Of course, our bodies […]

The post Cleansing the Body – How to Juice cleanse appeared first on Naked Juice Diet - Juicing & Fasting The RIGHT WAY.

// LISTEN: What’s happening on day three of #perouskenya?//

oxfamgb:

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